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Old 23 Mar 2008, 01:01 am
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Default Driven manual car first time:(?

Hey guys, So i managed to get the car home from the dealer( never drove stick before) anyways, its a 08 accord coupe. So someone on my street who i usually talk to here and there, so he started showing me how to drive stick. When he shifts i couldn't feel anythying. it was soo smooth compare to how i shift. anyways, the dealer said not to take the rpm over 3500, but he took it to all the way to 4000 at one point. I couldn't say anything cuz he was teaching me but is this bad for the car? how bad is it? should i be worried? Also when im taking off, i shift to first and i have my cluch in. While he cluch is in, can i start giving a bit of gas while the cluch is in or do i have to give gas while i'm releasing the cluch? I find it easier to launch the car if i give a bit of gas before i release the cluch.
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Old 23 Mar 2008, 01:16 am
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Taking it into 4000 RPM is not bad for the car at all. As long as you keep it out of the red part witch is normally around 6000 or 6500 RPM your car will be fine.And each person has a different way of driving a manual car. If you feel it better to give a little gas go for it. You will get use to it in time. I have driven only stick and I wont ever drive Automatic. But just practice and you will get use to it and find it a more enjoyable drive.Good Luck
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Old 23 Mar 2008, 01:31 am
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Rule of thumb shifting1. do both at the same time you really don't let off the gas a lot just enough to hold the rpms. make the shift quick lcutch in shift clutch out....2. shift 1-2 at 10-20 2-3 at 20-30and so on, running that rpm on anew car was nt smart for any engine but probably OK on a new one. you will see at 70 you are taching around 3000 I think..this shifting thing takes practice it's real easy and you will get used to it. But when you are being taught how to drive a stick why is the teacher driving. you are learning nothing. if he drives it again say something like WOW the manual says that is too high unless I am on the highway going 95....
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Old 23 Mar 2008, 01:46 am
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sticks are the only thing i care to drive and it wont hurt it if u give it a lil gas before u take off and a helpful trick if ur on a hill that will make u roll back instead of holding the brake is put it in first and then let out on the clutch until u feel it start to grab when it does keep it right in that area and push the gas slightly and it will keep u from rolling back with out holdin the break like if its at a light then all u have to do is take off and u dont have to let off the break and take off plus its good to do if people like to get right up behind u so that when u let off the break u dont roll back and hit them so well hope this helps some man
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Old 23 Mar 2008, 02:01 am
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The trick to driving a manual is basically learning how to feather the clutch. Hondas have a very soft feeling clutch, and can be a little tricky to get used to, but are very easy to drive with experience. There really is no reason for normal driving to go above 3500rpm. Normal shifting usually takes place between 2000-3000rpm for best gas mileage/shifting conditions. Hondas typically have a high redline and can very easily rev to 6000rpm without a problem. There is no need to worry about the dealer getting on the gas, probably was just demonstrating the potential of the car.
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Old 23 Mar 2008, 02:16 am
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The whole 4000 rpm thing was either the dealer trying to tell you how to get the best mpg out of it, or he's following the potential myth of breaking in an engine. -Keeping the rpms as low as possible, without bogging the engine, is the best way to get the most mpg out of your car. -There is a "rule" that a lot of people go by; keeping the rpms low until a certain point in time or until you put a certain amount of miles on the car. Some people swear by this, while others say to go the opposite way and rev the heck out of the engine immediately. This all has to do with how the piston rings seal to the cylinder walls. Improperly sealed rings will cause you to burn oil; the oil will flow past the rings into the combustion chamber (between the piston tops and head). I'm not talking about the oil flooding into the combustion chamber or anything. Different machine shops, engine builders, and engine tuners have different recommendations on how to break in an engine. So honestly don't worry about it at all. If you were redlining the engine occasionally, that'd be a different story. If you have the 4-cylinder, your max horsepower isn't even until 7000rpms, so you likely have a redline between 7600-8000rpms. If you have the V6, then your max power is at 6200rpms, so your redline is probably around 6800-7200-rpms. (max hp numbers taken from http://www.edmunds.com)Definitely give it a little gas before letting the clutch out. After a while you will get use to it, and it will be second nature. I've only been driving a manual transmission for about 3-4 years, and it's actually uncomfortable for me to drive an automatic car now.
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Old 23 Mar 2008, 02:31 am
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yeah u have to break in the engine before u start going fast or it can warp it... 4 grand isnt that bad i wouldnt worry but next time just tell him to take it easy till u break it in... look with the clutch its easy... theres a point halfway in where its a the shift point... you want your foot to be right there and shift into first and let it off as your giving it gas and it shouldnt lurch or anything and its the same with all the other gears down or up shifting...
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Old 23 Mar 2008, 02:46 am
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it should be fine reving up 4000 rpm, but don't do it to much if your car is new. until then rev to 3500 rpm and under until engine breaks in.give a bit of gas when releasing the clutch is the way to drive it. but since its your first time just drive like that until your better.best advice. practice
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Old 23 Mar 2008, 03:01 am
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The best way to drive stick shift is practice, and lots of it. It's like driving an automatic, but involving another pedal (called the clutch) and more hand-eye coordination (anyone can learn, don't worry). The braking and steering, though, are all pretty much the same as an automatic transmission car. I'll start with the basics: you have three pedals: the gas, the brake, and the clutch. Everybody knows what the brake does, so that's not important for now. The gas is a little different from an automatic, because it only controls the throttle, which can vary greatly depending on what gear you're in (I'll get into that more later). The clutch is the most important part of driving a stick shift. Holding the clutch all the way to the floor is just like having the car in neutral: you push the gas, and the engine just revs, not turning the wheels. Here's where it gets interesting, though, the clutch can "slip," meaning as you pull it out, the engine gains more and more traction on the wheels, allowing them to turn. If you tried to start the car in gear with the clutch not pushed in, it would stall (and lurch forward), because the starter motor would be trying to turn the wheels. It is the same if you start the car with the clutch in, but let it out too quickly: the engine will not have enough torque to turn the wheels, causing it to lurch, sputter, and eventually stall, which can be embarrassing for new drivers.As you probably already know from glancing at the gear shifter (but I'll say it anyway), the car has 5 or 6 gears, and a reverse gear. They generally move in an H pattern: moving the shifter left and up is first gear, moving it down and left is second gear, and so on. And neutral is when the gear shifter is centered in between of all the gears and moves fairly freely.Now that we have the basics covered, it's time to move on to actually driving. Like I said before, when starting the car, always make sure the clutch is all the way in, so it doesn't stall. Now comes the tricky part (which is also the part that takes practice). The idea is to let the clutch out to the "magical spot" where it engages the wheels, but not far enough that it lurches the car or stalls it. Hold the clutch in, put the car in first gear, and very slowly let the clutch out while giving the car gas. Repeating this exercise over and over again will help you find the correct balance of the gas and clutch. Don't be surprised if you stall it a few times: everyone does. Once you get going in first gear, the hard part's over, now on to the easy stuff.So lets say you've got the car moving in first gear. The car should be going faster, shouldn't it? Relax, it's supposed to be that way, that's what the gear changing is for. Once the tachometer (RPM) reaches about 3,000RPM, in one motion, promptly take your foot off the gas while pushing in the clutch, shift to second gear (down and left), then return to the gas while taking your foot off the clutch. If the car is now moving faster and the RPM dropped to 1,500 or 2,000, congratulations, you've got it into second gear! That's pretty much all the basics of driving a stick shift, because the same principles apply to all the other gears. When you get to 3,000RPM in 2nd gear, do the same action to switch to third. Same for third to fourth, same for fourth to fifth. That's it!This wouldn't be a really good answer if I didn't cover EVERYTHING you might encounter when driving a stick shift. So here’s some extra stuff (still useful). Let's say you're approaching a red light, and you need to stop (gradually). The way that works for me (and most stick shift drivers) is to shift into neutral (center the shifter), then apply the brake to stop. You won't need to push the clutch in when you stop, because in neutral the engine is not connected to the wheels.Another somewhat important aspect of stick shift driving is picking a gear if you DON'T stop. Let's say you were slowing down for that red light, but suddenly it turns green. There's no cars in front of you. If you're going 20-25MPH, you certainly don't want to stop the car and start from first gear. That will decidedly annoy many drivers around you. Pick a gear that properly suits your speed. If you try to shift into first gear going 20MPH, you will destroy your synchronizers, which are made to match the engine speed with the wheel speed. Also, shifting into 4th or 5th gear at this speed would cause the RPM to plummet, possibly stalling the car due to lack of power/torque. 3rd gear would be ideal, for this situation, because the car is going about as fast as the gear ratio was designed for.As you drive a stick shift more and more, you will begin to learn which speeds apply to which gear. This is very useful if you need to shift into a gear while still moving. Other than that, all stick shift driving takes is practice, which eventually makes perfect.Just my ramblings and too much time on my hands, but I just wrote what came to mind. Hope it helps!
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