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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 26 Oct 2004, 10:57 am
Toy_Man67
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Locked keys in car

This sounds impossible, but.... it actually works! I tried it out and it DID
work.

For those of you who have a car or truck that can be unlocked by a remote
key fob on your key ring, this may save you time and trouble. If you lock
your keys in the car and the spare keys (with your other remote key fob on
them) are at home, and you don't have "OnStar," here's your answer to the
problem.

If someone has access to the spare remote at your home, call them on your
cell phone (or borrow one from someone if the cell phone is locked in the
car too). Hold your cell phone about a foot from your car door and have the
other person (that you called) at your home press the unlock button, holding
it near the phone on their end.
Your car will unlock. Saves someone from having to drive your keys to you.
Distance is no object. You could be hundreds of miles away and, if you can
reach someone who has the other "remote" for your car, you can unlock the
doors (or the trunk, or have the "horn" signal go off, or whatever!)

Apparently, the radio wave sent out by the remote transmitter on your key
fob remote will piggy-back on the cellular wave signal generated by your
cell phone. I don't know how it works or why but it did work for me and my
wife so I thought I'd pass this on to the group just as an FYI.

M


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 26 Oct 2004, 02:03 pm
Randolph
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Locked keys in car

There was a long discuassion about this last year. It has no chance
whatsoever of working with any normal, current remote keyless entry
system.

Toy_Man67 wrote:
>
> This sounds impossible, but.... it actually works! I tried it out and it DID
> work.
>
> For those of you who have a car or truck that can be unlocked by a remote
> key fob on your key ring, this may save you time and trouble. If you lock
> your keys in the car and the spare keys (with your other remote key fob on
> them) are at home, and you don't have "OnStar," here's your answer to the
> problem.
>
> If someone has access to the spare remote at your home, call them on your
> cell phone (or borrow one from someone if the cell phone is locked in the
> car too). Hold your cell phone about a foot from your car door and have the
> other person (that you called) at your home press the unlock button, holding
> it near the phone on their end.
> Your car will unlock. Saves someone from having to drive your keys to you.
> Distance is no object. You could be hundreds of miles away and, if you can
> reach someone who has the other "remote" for your car, you can unlock the
> doors (or the trunk, or have the "horn" signal go off, or whatever!)
>
> Apparently, the radio wave sent out by the remote transmitter on your key
> fob remote will piggy-back on the cellular wave signal generated by your
> cell phone. I don't know how it works or why but it did work for me and my
> wife so I thought I'd pass this on to the group just as an FYI.
>
> M

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  #3 (permalink)  
Old 26 Oct 2004, 02:12 pm
Hank
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Locked keys in car

ALL B.S. Toy

"Toy_Man67" <m.goodwyn@cox.net> wrote in message
news:0tufd.17065$lp6.663@okepread01...
> This sounds impossible, but.... it actually works! I tried it out and it
> DID work.
>
> For those of you who have a car or truck that can be unlocked by a remote
> key fob on your key ring, this may save you time and trouble. If you lock
> your keys in the car and the spare keys (with your other remote key fob on
> them) are at home, and you don't have "OnStar," here's your answer to the
> problem.
>
> If someone has access to the spare remote at your home, call them on your
> cell phone (or borrow one from someone if the cell phone is locked in the
> car too). Hold your cell phone about a foot from your car door and have
> the other person (that you called) at your home press the unlock button,
> holding it near the phone on their end.
> Your car will unlock. Saves someone from having to drive your keys to you.
> Distance is no object. You could be hundreds of miles away and, if you can
> reach someone who has the other "remote" for your car, you can unlock the
> doors (or the trunk, or have the "horn" signal go off, or whatever!)
>
> Apparently, the radio wave sent out by the remote transmitter on your key
> fob remote will piggy-back on the cellular wave signal generated by your
> cell phone. I don't know how it works or why but it did work for me and my
> wife so I thought I'd pass this on to the group just as an FYI.
>
> M
>
>



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  #4 (permalink)  
Old 26 Oct 2004, 04:51 pm
computernewby
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Locked keys in car

your a ****ing idiot


"Toy_Man67" <m.goodwyn@cox.net> wrote in message
news:0tufd.17065$lp6.663@okepread01...
> This sounds impossible, but.... it actually works! I tried it out and it
> DID work.
>
> For those of you who have a car or truck that can be unlocked by a remote
> key fob on your key ring, this may save you time and trouble. If you lock
> your keys in the car and the spare keys (with your other remote key fob on
> them) are at home, and you don't have "OnStar," here's your answer to the
> problem.
>
> If someone has access to the spare remote at your home, call them on your
> cell phone (or borrow one from someone if the cell phone is locked in the
> car too). Hold your cell phone about a foot from your car door and have
> the other person (that you called) at your home press the unlock button,
> holding it near the phone on their end.
> Your car will unlock. Saves someone from having to drive your keys to you.
> Distance is no object. You could be hundreds of miles away and, if you can
> reach someone who has the other "remote" for your car, you can unlock the
> doors (or the trunk, or have the "horn" signal go off, or whatever!)
>
> Apparently, the radio wave sent out by the remote transmitter on your key
> fob remote will piggy-back on the cellular wave signal generated by your
> cell phone. I don't know how it works or why but it did work for me and my
> wife so I thought I'd pass this on to the group just as an FYI.
>
> M
>
>



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  #5 (permalink)  
Old 26 Oct 2004, 04:55 pm
Jafir Elkurd
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Locked keys in car

Is there anything ironic about that?

"computernewby" <somewhereovethe@rainbow.com> wrote in message
news:nrednbvC8OZMW-PcRVn-2w@comcast.com...
> your a ****ing idiot
>
>
> "Toy_Man67" <m.goodwyn@cox.net> wrote in message
> news:0tufd.17065$lp6.663@okepread01...
>> This sounds impossible, but.... it actually works! I tried it out and it
>> DID work.
>>
>> For those of you who have a car or truck that can be unlocked by a remote
>> key fob on your key ring, this may save you time and trouble. If you lock
>> your keys in the car and the spare keys (with your other remote key fob
>> on them) are at home, and you don't have "OnStar," here's your answer to
>> the problem.
>>
>> If someone has access to the spare remote at your home, call them on your
>> cell phone (or borrow one from someone if the cell phone is locked in the
>> car too). Hold your cell phone about a foot from your car door and have
>> the other person (that you called) at your home press the unlock button,
>> holding it near the phone on their end.
>> Your car will unlock. Saves someone from having to drive your keys to
>> you. Distance is no object. You could be hundreds of miles away and, if
>> you can reach someone who has the other "remote" for your car, you can
>> unlock the doors (or the trunk, or have the "horn" signal go off, or
>> whatever!)
>>
>> Apparently, the radio wave sent out by the remote transmitter on your key
>> fob remote will piggy-back on the cellular wave signal generated by your
>> cell phone. I don't know how it works or why but it did work for me and
>> my wife so I thought I'd pass this on to the group just as an FYI.
>>
>> M
>>
>>

>
>



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  #6 (permalink)  
Old 27 Oct 2004, 12:29 pm
Toy_Man67
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Locked keys in car

Gosh fellas, thanks for setting me straight on that "TOTAL BS". Apparently,
I am a "****ing idiot" and have no idea what I'm doing. It must have been
the wind that unlocked and opened the doors on my 2000 Honda Odyssey, not my
wife on a cell phone 12 miles away holding the other remote in her hands.

I saw that it worked, thought I'd be nice enough to offer the information to
anyone interested in it and I get lambasted by some of you with no regard
for the intent to which it was offered.

Thank you, Randolph, for your kind and educated reply. I too, take most of
the things like this with a grain of salt and usually check them out on
www.snopes.com to see if they're just another urban legend. However,
curiosity got the better of me and since it didn't take me any time or extra
effort, I tried it out for myself. What do you know? It actually worked!

Oh, by the way ComputerNewby, I would suggest learning a little English as
the word "your" in the context to which you attempted to apply it is a
contraction and should be spelled "YOU'RE" as in, "You're a ****ing moron,
Newby!"

M


"Toy_Man67" <m.goodwyn@cox.net> wrote in message
news:0tufd.17065$lp6.663@okepread01...
> This sounds impossible, but.... it actually works! I tried it out and it
> DID work.
>
> For those of you who have a car or truck that can be unlocked by a remote
> key fob on your key ring, this may save you time and trouble. If you lock
> your keys in the car and the spare keys (with your other remote key fob on
> them) are at home, and you don't have "OnStar," here's your answer to the
> problem.
>
> If someone has access to the spare remote at your home, call them on your
> cell phone (or borrow one from someone if the cell phone is locked in the
> car too). Hold your cell phone about a foot from your car door and have
> the other person (that you called) at your home press the unlock button,
> holding it near the phone on their end.
> Your car will unlock. Saves someone from having to drive your keys to you.
> Distance is no object. You could be hundreds of miles away and, if you can
> reach someone who has the other "remote" for your car, you can unlock the
> doors (or the trunk, or have the "horn" signal go off, or whatever!)
>
> Apparently, the radio wave sent out by the remote transmitter on your key
> fob remote will piggy-back on the cellular wave signal generated by your
> cell phone. I don't know how it works or why but it did work for me and my
> wife so I thought I'd pass this on to the group just as an FYI.
>
> M
>
>



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  #7 (permalink)  
Old 27 Oct 2004, 02:28 pm
Elliot Richmond
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Locked keys in car

On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 12:29:06 -0500, "Toy_Man67" <m.goodwyn@cox.net>
wrote:

>Gosh fellas, thanks for setting me straight on that "TOTAL BS".


Do not take it personally. We took the posting for a troll.

I think it is a physical impossibility that your wife pressing the
remote control near the other phone opened the doors on your car. If
the situation is as you described, then it was a coincidence. The
signal from a mobile phone is received by a local antenna, processed,
compressed, sent to a satellite or a land line or a microwave network
or fiber optics or whatever. There it is redirected to a transmitter
near the receiving phone which sends the digital signal to the
receiving phone. Even if a radio signal was sent straight from one
phone to another, there is no way one signal could "piggyback" on the
other as described. It is possible to piggyback or multiplex signals,
but not just by "mixing" them in the air.

Mobile phones do emit radio frequency waves. If you set your phone
next to most any electronic device that has a speaker, you will
occasionally hear a series of beeps or buzzes. This is the phone
"checking in." This is also why we are reasonably expected to turn the
things off on airplanes. My guess is that your phone emitted a radio
frequency signal that just happened to match or have a resonance near
enough to the frequency and digital signature that told your car to
unlock its doors. If so, that is worth keeping in mind.

Soon we will all carry only one gadget. It will be a universal
television remote, automobile ignition key/starter, camera, mobile
phone, blackberry message system, debit card, web browser, GPS unit,
emergency transponder, garage door opener. At present, all of the
above functions are available in some combinations and separate
devices necessary for these functions could be stuffed into one roomy
shirt pocket, so a single device is on the horizon.

Won't that be fun.

Elliot Richmond
Freelance Science Writer and Editor
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  #8 (permalink)  
Old 27 Oct 2004, 02:29 pm
Hank
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Locked keys in car

Toy, you're Toying with us.

"Toy_Man67" <m.goodwyn@cox.net> wrote in message
news:sVQfd.24410$lp6.8313@okepread01...
> Gosh fellas, thanks for setting me straight on that "TOTAL BS".
> Apparently, I am a "****ing idiot" and have no idea what I'm doing. It
> must have been the wind that unlocked and opened the doors on my 2000
> Honda Odyssey, not my wife on a cell phone 12 miles away holding the other
> remote in her hands.
>
> I saw that it worked, thought I'd be nice enough to offer the information
> to anyone interested in it and I get lambasted by some of you with no
> regard for the intent to which it was offered.
>
> Thank you, Randolph, for your kind and educated reply. I too, take most of
> the things like this with a grain of salt and usually check them out on
> www.snopes.com to see if they're just another urban legend. However,
> curiosity got the better of me and since it didn't take me any time or
> extra effort, I tried it out for myself. What do you know? It actually
> worked!
>
> Oh, by the way ComputerNewby, I would suggest learning a little English as
> the word "your" in the context to which you attempted to apply it is a
> contraction and should be spelled "YOU'RE" as in, "You're a ****ing moron,
> Newby!"
>
> M
>
>
> "Toy_Man67" <m.goodwyn@cox.net> wrote in message
> news:0tufd.17065$lp6.663@okepread01...
>> This sounds impossible, but.... it actually works! I tried it out and it
>> DID work.
>>
>> For those of you who have a car or truck that can be unlocked by a remote
>> key fob on your key ring, this may save you time and trouble. If you lock
>> your keys in the car and the spare keys (with your other remote key fob
>> on them) are at home, and you don't have "OnStar," here's your answer to
>> the problem.
>>
>> If someone has access to the spare remote at your home, call them on your
>> cell phone (or borrow one from someone if the cell phone is locked in the
>> car too). Hold your cell phone about a foot from your car door and have
>> the other person (that you called) at your home press the unlock button,
>> holding it near the phone on their end.
>> Your car will unlock. Saves someone from having to drive your keys to
>> you. Distance is no object. You could be hundreds of miles away and, if
>> you can reach someone who has the other "remote" for your car, you can
>> unlock the doors (or the trunk, or have the "horn" signal go off, or
>> whatever!)
>>
>> Apparently, the radio wave sent out by the remote transmitter on your key
>> fob remote will piggy-back on the cellular wave signal generated by your
>> cell phone. I don't know how it works or why but it did work for me and
>> my wife so I thought I'd pass this on to the group just as an FYI.
>>
>> M
>>
>>

>
>



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  #9 (permalink)  
Old 27 Oct 2004, 07:02 pm
Harry Cox
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Locked keys in car

Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence - Carl Sagan.

On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 12:29:06 -0500, "Toy_Man67" <m.goodwyn@cox.net>
wrote:

>Gosh fellas, thanks for setting me straight on that "TOTAL BS". Apparently,
>I am a "****ing idiot" and have no idea what I'm doing. It must have been
>the wind that unlocked and opened the doors on my 2000 Honda Odyssey, not my
>wife on a cell phone 12 miles away holding the other remote in her hands.
>
>I saw that it worked, thought I'd be nice enough to offer the information to
>anyone interested in it and I get lambasted by some of you with no regard
>for the intent to which it was offered.
>
>Thank you, Randolph, for your kind and educated reply. I too, take most of
>the things like this with a grain of salt and usually check them out on
>www.snopes.com to see if they're just another urban legend. However,
>curiosity got the better of me and since it didn't take me any time or extra
>effort, I tried it out for myself. What do you know? It actually worked!
>
>Oh, by the way ComputerNewby, I would suggest learning a little English as
>the word "your" in the context to which you attempted to apply it is a
>contraction and should be spelled "YOU'RE" as in, "You're a ****ing moron,
>Newby!"
>
>M
>
>
>"Toy_Man67" <m.goodwyn@cox.net> wrote in message
>news:0tufd.17065$lp6.663@okepread01...
>> This sounds impossible, but.... it actually works! I tried it out and it
>> DID work.
>>
>> For those of you who have a car or truck that can be unlocked by a remote
>> key fob on your key ring, this may save you time and trouble. If you lock
>> your keys in the car and the spare keys (with your other remote key fob on
>> them) are at home, and you don't have "OnStar," here's your answer to the
>> problem.
>>
>> If someone has access to the spare remote at your home, call them on your
>> cell phone (or borrow one from someone if the cell phone is locked in the
>> car too). Hold your cell phone about a foot from your car door and have
>> the other person (that you called) at your home press the unlock button,
>> holding it near the phone on their end.
>> Your car will unlock. Saves someone from having to drive your keys to you.
>> Distance is no object. You could be hundreds of miles away and, if you can
>> reach someone who has the other "remote" for your car, you can unlock the
>> doors (or the trunk, or have the "horn" signal go off, or whatever!)
>>
>> Apparently, the radio wave sent out by the remote transmitter on your key
>> fob remote will piggy-back on the cellular wave signal generated by your
>> cell phone. I don't know how it works or why but it did work for me and my
>> wife so I thought I'd pass this on to the group just as an FYI.
>>
>> M
>>
>>

>


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  #10 (permalink)  
Old 28 Oct 2004, 11:43 am
Toy_Man67
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Locked keys in car

Folks, I'm eating crow and it tastes horrible. lol I posted this as a
simple, honest FYI. I was not lying about it and I am not a troll. It did
happen to work for me on that one occasion but it was most likely a fluke
and I'm not going to defend it or try to explain my way out of it. Nor will
I spread this information around to anyone else. I cannot argue with proven
science and I in no way intended to mislead anyone with this information.

If you will check out the Toyota newsgroup, alt.autos.toyota.trucks, you
will see postings by "Mac" and "Bruce L. Bergman" explaining how these
things work and how my random example cannot possibly be repeated in a
scientific manner. I am thankful for their enlightenment and their
respectful way of educating me.

I stand humbly corrected.

M


"Harry Cox" <Cox@SomeDomain.com> wrote in message
news:fnd0o0h63jp1o1dlo97j0vvji5b0vcvq0h@4ax.com...
> Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence - Carl Sagan.
>
> On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 12:29:06 -0500, "Toy_Man67" <m.goodwyn@cox.net>
> wrote:
>
>>Gosh fellas, thanks for setting me straight on that "TOTAL BS".
>>Apparently,
>>I am a "****ing idiot" and have no idea what I'm doing. It must have been
>>the wind that unlocked and opened the doors on my 2000 Honda Odyssey, not
>>my
>>wife on a cell phone 12 miles away holding the other remote in her hands.
>>
>>I saw that it worked, thought I'd be nice enough to offer the information
>>to
>>anyone interested in it and I get lambasted by some of you with no regard
>>for the intent to which it was offered.
>>
>>Thank you, Randolph, for your kind and educated reply. I too, take most of
>>the things like this with a grain of salt and usually check them out on
>>www.snopes.com to see if they're just another urban legend. However,
>>curiosity got the better of me and since it didn't take me any time or
>>extra
>>effort, I tried it out for myself. What do you know? It actually worked!
>>
>>Oh, by the way ComputerNewby, I would suggest learning a little English as
>>the word "your" in the context to which you attempted to apply it is a
>>contraction and should be spelled "YOU'RE" as in, "You're a ****ing moron,
>>Newby!"
>>
>>M
>>
>>
>>"Toy_Man67" <m.goodwyn@cox.net> wrote in message
>>news:0tufd.17065$lp6.663@okepread01...
>>> This sounds impossible, but.... it actually works! I tried it out and it
>>> DID work.
>>>
>>> For those of you who have a car or truck that can be unlocked by a
>>> remote
>>> key fob on your key ring, this may save you time and trouble. If you
>>> lock
>>> your keys in the car and the spare keys (with your other remote key fob
>>> on
>>> them) are at home, and you don't have "OnStar," here's your answer to
>>> the
>>> problem.
>>>
>>> If someone has access to the spare remote at your home, call them on
>>> your
>>> cell phone (or borrow one from someone if the cell phone is locked in
>>> the
>>> car too). Hold your cell phone about a foot from your car door and have
>>> the other person (that you called) at your home press the unlock button,
>>> holding it near the phone on their end.
>>> Your car will unlock. Saves someone from having to drive your keys to
>>> you.
>>> Distance is no object. You could be hundreds of miles away and, if you
>>> can
>>> reach someone who has the other "remote" for your car, you can unlock
>>> the
>>> doors (or the trunk, or have the "horn" signal go off, or whatever!)
>>>
>>> Apparently, the radio wave sent out by the remote transmitter on your
>>> key
>>> fob remote will piggy-back on the cellular wave signal generated by your
>>> cell phone. I don't know how it works or why but it did work for me and
>>> my
>>> wife so I thought I'd pass this on to the group just as an FYI.
>>>
>>> M
>>>
>>>

>>

>



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