Honda Car Forum


 

Go Back   Honda Car Forum - Accord Parts Civic Tuning Acura Racing > Honda Acura > Honda 2

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 10 May 2008, 02:16 am
Bow Wow
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Plan on driving a new car on a 3000mile highway trip. Bad idea?

I was planning on taking my soon to take possession Pilot on a trip
which will consist mostly of highway driving of about 3000mile drive
and been told that that's not such a good idea because you don't want
to drive a brand new car on the highway for any extended amount if you
can help before the car's properly broken in.

The seals, rings and the machine just needs to set in properly, which
happens during the break in period and before that, I was told you
should avoid any long highway trip.

What do you guys think? If this was your car, would you do it or put
off the trip until after the car's broken in properly? Thanks.
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 10 May 2008, 03:56 am
Dave Kelsen
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Plan on driving a new car on a 3000mile highway trip. Bad idea?

On 5/10/2008 1:16 AM Bow Wow spake these words of knowledge:

> I was planning on taking my soon to take possession Pilot on a trip
> which will consist mostly of highway driving of about 3000mile drive
> and been told that that's not such a good idea because you don't want
> to drive a brand new car on the highway for any extended amount if you
> can help before the car's properly broken in.
>
> The seals, rings and the machine just needs to set in properly, which
> happens during the break in period and before that, I was told you
> should avoid any long highway trip.
>
> What do you guys think? If this was your car, would you do it or put
> off the trip until after the car's broken in properly? Thanks.


The break-in period admonitions still apply; you were told correctly.
You can make the trip, but you'll want to vary the RPMs of your engine,
which can be annoying and even dangerous to others - because of the
unpredictability.

If this was my car, I would in fact avoid a long trip until after I had
*at least* 1000 miles of variated driving.


RFT!!!
Dave Kelsen
--
"Experience teaches us to be most on our guard to protect liberty when
the government's purpose is beneficent." -- Supreme Court Justice Louis
Brandeis
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 10 May 2008, 06:48 am
Ray
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Plan on driving a new car on a 3000mile highway trip. Bad idea?

If you have not yet gotten the car, go by the dealer and look at one
of the owner"s manuals for that model. There is no problem on taking a
long trip that I know of. Of course you vary the speed, which means
you may run at 65 for a while then ease off to 55 for another 10
minutes and back up to 65. That doesn't create a danger to other cars.
Don't forget, pulling in for gas or food also varies the speed. I
don't think you will have any problem with the trip. The last two
Hondas I've owned were on long trips immediately after purchase and I
never saw any degradation of the cars performance because of that.
Enjoy

On Sat, 10 May 2008 00:16:59 -0600, Bow Wow <Bow@Wow.com> wrote:

>I was planning on taking my soon to take possession Pilot on a trip
>which will consist mostly of highway driving of about 3000mile drive
>and been told that that's not such a good idea because you don't want
>to drive a brand new car on the highway for any extended amount if you
>can help before the car's properly broken in.
>
>The seals, rings and the machine just needs to set in properly, which
>happens during the break in period and before that, I was told you
>should avoid any long highway trip.
>
>What do you guys think? If this was your car, would you do it or put
>off the trip until after the car's broken in properly? Thanks.

Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 10 May 2008, 08:18 am
Jeff
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Plan on driving a new car on a 3000mile highway trip. Bad idea?

Bow Wow wrote:
> I was planning on taking my soon to take possession Pilot on a trip
> which will consist mostly of highway driving of about 3000mile drive
> and been told that that's not such a good idea because you don't want
> to drive a brand new car on the highway for any extended amount if you
> can help before the car's properly broken in.


A brand new 1975 Ford Pinto, perhaps, but today's cars are machined to
higher standards. Taking the truck (the Pilot is a truck, not a car) on
a 3000-mile trip is just fine. The only problem you will have is paying
for the fuel.

> The seals, rings and the machine just needs to set in properly, which
> happens during the break in period and before that, I was told you
> should avoid any long highway trip.


By whom?

> What do you guys think? If this was your car, would you do it or put
> off the trip until after the car's broken in properly? Thanks.


Yes. But, in this case, that's when the truck comes off the dealer lot.

Jeff
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 10 May 2008, 08:29 am
Elmo P. Shagnasty
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Plan on driving a new car on a 3000mile highway trip. Bad idea?

In article <NogVj.71$ll1.35@trndny06>, Jeff <kidsdoc2000@hotmail.com>
wrote:

> Taking the truck (the Pilot is a truck, not a car)


It's a car.

It's intended to be a car, he drives it like a car, he calls it a car,
it's a car.

Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 10 May 2008, 08:31 am
Jeff
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Plan on driving a new car on a 3000mile highway trip. Bad idea?

Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:
> In article <NogVj.71$ll1.35@trndny06>, Jeff <kidsdoc2000@hotmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>> Taking the truck (the Pilot is a truck, not a car)

>
> It's a car.
>
> It's intended to be a car, he drives it like a car, he calls it a car,
> it's a car.
>


You can drive a 18-wheeler like a car if you want. But, it's still a
truck. A Pilot meets the safety requirements of a truck, not a car. It
is licensed like a truck. It gets gasoline mileage like a truck.

It's a truck.

Jeff
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 10 May 2008, 10:35 am
Jim Yanik
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Plan on driving a new car on a 3000mile highway trip. Bad idea?

"Elmo P. Shagnasty" <elmop@nastydesigns.com> wrote in news:elmop-
FFB1B4.08291210052008@nntp9.usenetserver.com:

> In article <NogVj.71$ll1.35@trndny06>, Jeff <kidsdoc2000@hotmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>> Taking the truck (the Pilot is a truck, not a car)

>
> It's a car.
>
> It's intended to be a car, he drives it like a car, he calls it a car,
> it's a car.
>
>


I suspect it's classified as a "light truck".
Just like the PT Cruiser used to be classified,before they made a ragtop
version.

--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
at
kua.net
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 10 May 2008, 10:37 am
Hachiroku ハチロク
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Plan on driving a new car on a 3000mile highway trip. Bad idea?

On Sat, 10 May 2008 00:19:20 -0600, Bow Wow wrote:

> I was planning on taking my soon to take possession Highlander V6 on a
> trip which will consist mostly of highway driving of about 3000mile drive
> and been told that that's not such a good idea because you don't want to
> drive a brand new car on the highway for any extended amount if you can
> help before the car's properly broken in.
>
> The seals, rings and the machine just needs to set in properly, which
> happens during the break in period and before that, I was told you should
> avoid any long highway trip.
>
> What do you guys think? If this was your car, would you do it or put off
> the trip until after the car's broken in properly? Thanks.


I'm old-school. I drive a car 1500 miles and then do the first oil change.
Then I do the next one at 3000 miles, and every 3-3500 after that.

I also had 3 cars go over 250,000 miles without burning oil.

Five-hundred miles is approx 8 hours. I would prbably go pretty easy for
the first 1,000 miles, secondary roads and short stretches on the highway
around cities. This will do two things; allow the machine to run at
something other than wide open, and force variations in load and speed
like the manual says to do.

It seems I can tell when a car was broken in properly or not. On cars I
had had new, they don't tend to develop 'notches' at certain speeds. By
this I mean, on cars other than ones I bought new, I can notice that the
car seems to hit a stride ~45-50 MPH, and another ~70 MPH. What I assume
is that the person that bought the car new had two driving modes:
secondary roads (45 MPH) and highway (70 MPH). I have noticed this on a
few used cars I have owned.

On cars I bought new and broke in properly, there weren't any 'notches',
everything was fairly even across the range.

You will hit speeds and conditions on any car, no matter how it was broken
in due to engine and mechanical efficiencies. On most 4 cylinder Toyotas I
have owned, they seem to hit their stride 70~75 MPH, since I assume this
is the engine's most efficient mode. I have noticed this on 4 or 5 Toyotas
I have owned. Always got the best economy at about 72 MPH in 5th gear.

Of course, with newer cars and a V6, things are different now, but I would
still take it pretty easy for the first 1500 miles, and stop and have the
oil changed.

Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 10 May 2008, 10:58 am
Jeff
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Plan on driving a new car on a 3000mile highway trip. Bad idea?

Hachiroku * wrote:
> On Sat, 10 May 2008 00:19:20 -0600, Bow Wow wrote:
>
>> I was planning on taking my soon to take possession Highlander V6 on a
>> trip which will consist mostly of highway driving of about 3000mile drive
>> and been told that that's not such a good idea because you don't want to
>> drive a brand new car on the highway for any extended amount if you can
>> help before the car's properly broken in.
>>
>> The seals, rings and the machine just needs to set in properly, which
>> happens during the break in period and before that, I was told you should
>> avoid any long highway trip.
>>
>> What do you guys think? If this was your car, would you do it or put off
>> the trip until after the car's broken in properly? Thanks.

>
> I'm old-school. I drive a car 1500 miles and then do the first oil change.
> Then I do the next one at 3000 miles, and every 3-3500 after that.
>
> I also had 3 cars go over 250,000 miles without burning oil.
>
> Five-hundred miles is approx 8 hours. I would prbably go pretty easy for
> the first 1,000 miles, secondary roads and short stretches on the highway
> around cities. This will do two things; allow the machine to run at
> something other than wide open, and force variations in load and speed
> like the manual says to do.
>
> It seems I can tell when a car was broken in properly or not. On cars I
> had had new, they don't tend to develop 'notches' at certain speeds. By
> this I mean, on cars other than ones I bought new, I can notice that the
> car seems to hit a stride ~45-50 MPH, and another ~70 MPH. What I assume
> is that the person that bought the car new had two driving modes:
> secondary roads (45 MPH) and highway (70 MPH). I have noticed this on a
> few used cars I have owned.
>
> On cars I bought new and broke in properly, there weren't any 'notches',
> everything was fairly even across the range.
>
> You will hit speeds and conditions on any car, no matter how it was broken
> in due to engine and mechanical efficiencies. On most 4 cylinder Toyotas I
> have owned, they seem to hit their stride 70~75 MPH, since I assume this
> is the engine's most efficient mode. I have noticed this on 4 or 5 Toyotas
> I have owned. Always got the best economy at about 72 MPH in 5th gear.


How do you know that the speeds that the cars were driven at had
anything to do with these "strides"? And why would driving a car a
particular speed cause this?

I think you don't know what you're talking about.

From the owner's manual for a 2008 Pilot:

"Help assure your vehicles future
reliability and performance by paying
extra attention to how you drive
during the first 600 miles (1,000 km).
During this period:
Avoid full-throttle starts and rapid
acceleration.
Do not change the oil until the
scheduled maintenance time.
Avoid hard braking for the first
200 miles (300 km).
Do not tow a trailer.
You should also follow these
recommendations with an
overhauled or exchanged engine, or
when the brakes are replaced."

Note what the manual says about the first oil change.



> Of course, with newer cars and a V6, things are different now, but I would
> still take it pretty easy for the first 1500 miles, and stop and have the
> oil changed.
>

Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 10 May 2008, 11:30 am
jim beam
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Plan on driving a new car on a 3000mile highway trip. Bad idea?

Jeff wrote:
> Hachiroku * wrote:
>> On Sat, 10 May 2008 00:19:20 -0600, Bow Wow wrote:
>>
>>> I was planning on taking my soon to take possession Highlander V6 on a
>>> trip which will consist mostly of highway driving of about 3000mile
>>> drive
>>> and been told that that's not such a good idea because you don't want to
>>> drive a brand new car on the highway for any extended amount if you can
>>> help before the car's properly broken in.
>>>
>>> The seals, rings and the machine just needs to set in properly, which
>>> happens during the break in period and before that, I was told you
>>> should
>>> avoid any long highway trip.
>>>
>>> What do you guys think? If this was your car, would you do it or put
>>> off
>>> the trip until after the car's broken in properly? Thanks.

>>
>> I'm old-school. I drive a car 1500 miles and then do the first oil
>> change.
>> Then I do the next one at 3000 miles, and every 3-3500 after that.
>>
>> I also had 3 cars go over 250,000 miles without burning oil.
>> Five-hundred miles is approx 8 hours. I would prbably go pretty easy for
>> the first 1,000 miles, secondary roads and short stretches on the highway
>> around cities. This will do two things; allow the machine to run at
>> something other than wide open, and force variations in load and speed
>> like the manual says to do.
>>
>> It seems I can tell when a car was broken in properly or not. On cars I
>> had had new, they don't tend to develop 'notches' at certain speeds. By
>> this I mean, on cars other than ones I bought new, I can notice that the
>> car seems to hit a stride ~45-50 MPH, and another ~70 MPH. What I assume
>> is that the person that bought the car new had two driving modes:
>> secondary roads (45 MPH) and highway (70 MPH). I have noticed this on a
>> few used cars I have owned.
>>
>> On cars I bought new and broke in properly, there weren't any 'notches',
>> everything was fairly even across the range.
>> You will hit speeds and conditions on any car, no matter how it was
>> broken
>> in due to engine and mechanical efficiencies. On most 4 cylinder
>> Toyotas I
>> have owned, they seem to hit their stride 70~75 MPH, since I assume this
>> is the engine's most efficient mode. I have noticed this on 4 or 5
>> Toyotas
>> I have owned. Always got the best economy at about 72 MPH in 5th gear.

>
> How do you know that the speeds that the cars were driven at had
> anything to do with these "strides"? And why would driving a car a
> particular speed cause this?
>
> I think you don't know what you're talking about.
>
> From the owner's manual for a 2008 Pilot:
>
> "Help assure your vehicles future
> reliability and performance by paying
> extra attention to how you drive
> during the first 600 miles (1,000 km).
> During this period:
> Avoid full-throttle starts and rapid
> acceleration.
> Do not change the oil until the
> scheduled maintenance time.
> Avoid hard braking for the first
> 200 miles (300 km).
> Do not tow a trailer.
> You should also follow these
> recommendations with an
> overhauled or exchanged engine, or
> when the brakes are replaced."
>
> Note what the manual says about the first oil change.
>
>
>
>> Of course, with newer cars and a V6, things are different now, but I
>> would
>> still take it pretty easy for the first 1500 miles, and stop and have the
>> oil changed.




what??? read the manual??? no freakin' chance buddy! we're all going
to have a retardation contest here on usenet and take the words of
nameless idiots with our new multi-thousand dollar investments, not the
experts that researched, designed and manufactured the freakin' thing!

imagine these guys in aerospace: "yeah, but this guy said those cracks
didn't matter".
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Plan on selling my 1994 CRV EX with 35K mileage. Any idea of a reasonable price? johnmonroe Honda Technical 7 19 Oct 2007 09:24 am
I'm still driving a Honda Civic 1984 low milage can I go on a trip? mrsmay59 Honda Technical 9 03 Oct 2007 03:34 pm
'90 Civic hot after 1 hr highway trip, overflowing coolant Bruce Honda 3 10 24 Jul 2005 10:50 am
Highway driving DavidB Honda 2 3 17 Aug 2003 08:58 pm


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:31 am.


Attribution:
Honda News | Autoblog
Powered by Yahoo Answers




Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2 © 2011, Crawlability, Inc.
HondaCarForum.com is not affiliated with Honda Motor Company in any way. Honda Motor Company does not sponsor, support, or endorse HondaCarForum.com in any way. Copyright/trademark/sales mark infringements are not intended or implied.