Honda Car Forum


 

Go Back   Honda Car Forum - Accord Parts Civic Tuning Acura Racing > Honda Acura > Honda 2

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 08 Aug 2007, 05:36 pm
Greg
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Axle replacement - 95 Accord

Last weekend a friend and I replaced both axles in my 1995 Accord. The
passenger side (smaller) axle came right out with no hassle. The
drivers side, however, was so rusted into the hub that we had to take
the whole hub/axle assembly off the car so that we could better pound
it with a big 3lb hammer and an air chisel. After a LOT of pounding it
finally came out. Is this something that happens frequently with older
cars? If so, is there a better way to get those things out?
Penetrating oil didn't seem to help much. Even the air chisel didn't
do anything until after the big hammer got the thing loose.

Luckily after we got the old axle out the hub was still in good shape
and the new axle went right in with no problems. What a pain! This is
just another case of the shop manual being soo far off of reality (The
book says to remove the axle using a rubber mallet--no way!!).

Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 08 Aug 2007, 09:49 pm
jim beam
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Axle replacement - 95 Accord

Greg wrote:
> Last weekend a friend and I replaced both axles in my 1995 Accord. The
> passenger side (smaller) axle came right out with no hassle. The
> drivers side, however, was so rusted into the hub that we had to take
> the whole hub/axle assembly off the car so that we could better pound
> it with a big 3lb hammer and an air chisel. After a LOT of pounding it
> finally came out. Is this something that happens frequently with older
> cars? If so, is there a better way to get those things out?
> Penetrating oil didn't seem to help much. Even the air chisel didn't
> do anything until after the big hammer got the thing loose.
>
> Luckily after we got the old axle out the hub was still in good shape
> and the new axle went right in with no problems. What a pain! This is
> just another case of the shop manual being soo far off of reality (The
> book says to remove the axle using a rubber mallet--no way!!).
>


3lb hammer? unfortunately, you'll now need to replace the bearings shortly.

for future reference, never beat the axle to get it out - use a proper
pulling tool that doesn't load the bearings. hammering brinnels the
bearings and reduces longevity to almost zero.
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 09 Aug 2007, 10:57 am
Greg
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Axle replacement - 95 Accord

> 3lb hammer? unfortunately, you'll now need to replace the bearings shortly.
>
> for future reference, never beat the axle to get it out - use a proper
> pulling tool that doesn't load the bearings. hammering brinnels the
> bearings and reduces longevity to almost zero.


Jim - thanks for your reply. Could you specifically suggest a tool
that I should have used--preferably something I could buy online or at
a local store? I looked around the web a bit and didn't see anything
that I thought would work. I did see some tools for rear axles that
use a slide-hammer. To be honest with you, the axle was stuck in there
so badly that I really don't think a slide hammer would have gotten it
out. Maybe when the axle is rusted in there that badly, you just have
to hammer it out like I did and plan on replacing the bearings? I have
another honda and if I have to do the same job on it, I'd like to make
sure I do it the best way. Thanks again.

Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 09 Aug 2007, 01:15 pm
Michael Pardee
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Axle replacement - 95 Accord

"Greg" <centaur99@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1186675079.936930.54290@e9g2000prf.googlegrou ps.com...
>> 3lb hammer? unfortunately, you'll now need to replace the bearings
>> shortly.
>>
>> for future reference, never beat the axle to get it out - use a proper
>> pulling tool that doesn't load the bearings. hammering brinnels the
>> bearings and reduces longevity to almost zero.

>
> Jim - thanks for your reply. Could you specifically suggest a tool
> that I should have used--preferably something I could buy online or at
> a local store? I looked around the web a bit and didn't see anything
> that I thought would work. I did see some tools for rear axles that
> use a slide-hammer. To be honest with you, the axle was stuck in there
> so badly that I really don't think a slide hammer would have gotten it
> out. Maybe when the axle is rusted in there that badly, you just have
> to hammer it out like I did and plan on replacing the bearings? I have
> another honda and if I have to do the same job on it, I'd like to make
> sure I do it the best way. Thanks again.
>
>

Here in Arizona we don't have that problem - no rust to speak of. A couple
taps with a rubber mallet on the back of the steering knuckle is enough. But
if we did, I'd probably go for a rag folded over to make a fairly thick pad
and then applying a heavy "mallet" (like the end of several feet of 2X4) to
the end. What you want is a "dead blow." Brinneling the bearings occurs if
the actual impact is so high it can dent the bearing races, while the real
work of separating the parts is done by transferring impulse. Similarly, you
can try holding the axle and whacking the knuckle (not yours, the car's!)
with a mallet on as many different locations as you can reach over and over.
As long as you don't lay metal to metal you shouldn't brinnel the bearings.
Patience might just pay off.

The proper tool is undoubtedly a press, but that requires complete removal
of the steering knuckle. There may be nothing else to hold the bearings in
while pressing on the axle, so it is possible the bearings could come out
still jammed onto the axle splines. Or the disc may be in the way... dunno
about the '95 Accord in that way.

In any case, for you the die has been cast. It would be great if you can
provide some follow-up regarding symptoms (noise, pulling toward the side
you were working on) and whether you had to replace the bearings as a
result.

Mike

"Good judgement comes from experience; experience often comes from bad
judgement."



Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 09 Aug 2007, 03:50 pm
greg.berchelmann@gmail.com
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Axle replacement - 95 Accord

On Aug 9, 1:15 pm, "Michael Pardee" <michaeltn...@cybertrails.com>
wrote:
> "Greg" <centau...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:1186675079.936930.54290@e9g2000prf.googlegrou ps.com...
>
> >> 3lb hammer? unfortunately, you'll now need to replace the bearings
> >> shortly.

>
> >> for future reference, never beat the axle to get it out - use a proper
> >> pulling tool that doesn't load the bearings. hammering brinnels the
> >> bearings and reduces longevity to almost zero.

>
> > Jim - thanks for your reply. Could you specifically suggest a tool
> > that I should have used--preferably something I could buy online or at
> > a local store? I looked around the web a bit and didn't see anything
> > that I thought would work. I did see some tools for rear axles that
> > use a slide-hammer. To be honest with you, the axle was stuck in there
> > so badly that I really don't think a slide hammer would have gotten it
> > out. Maybe when the axle is rusted in there that badly, you just have
> > to hammer it out like I did and plan on replacing the bearings? I have
> > another honda and if I have to do the same job on it, I'd like to make
> > sure I do it the best way. Thanks again.

>
> Here in Arizona we don't have that problem - no rust to speak of. A couple
> taps with a rubber mallet on the back of the steering knuckle is enough. But
> if we did, I'd probably go for a rag folded over to make a fairly thick pad
> and then applying a heavy "mallet" (like the end of several feet of 2X4) to
> the end. What you want is a "dead blow." Brinneling the bearings occurs if
> the actual impact is so high it can dent the bearing races, while the real
> work of separating the parts is done by transferring impulse. Similarly, you
> can try holding the axle and whacking the knuckle (not yours, the car's!)
> with a mallet on as many different locations as you can reach over and over.
> As long as you don't lay metal to metal you shouldn't brinnel the bearings.
> Patience might just pay off.
>
> The proper tool is undoubtedly a press, but that requires complete removal
> of the steering knuckle. There may be nothing else to hold the bearings in
> while pressing on the axle, so it is possible the bearings could come out
> still jammed onto the axle splines. Or the disc may be in the way... dunno
> about the '95 Accord in that way.
>
> In any case, for you the die has been cast. It would be great if you can
> provide some follow-up regarding symptoms (noise, pulling toward the side
> you were working on) and whether you had to replace the bearings as a
> result.
>
> Mike
>
> "Good judgement comes from experience; experience often comes from bad
> judgement."


Thanks for your reply, Mike. Your explanation of how the bearings are
impacted (!) makes a lot of sense to me. I think that concept applies
to lots of other situations as well, so I'll keep it in mind for
future reference.

The friend who was helping me actually has a press in his basement,
which is why we took out the whole knuckle and axle assembly. The
problem that we had was that the attached axle did not fit through the
hole on his press. There was no way to secure the assembly in such a
way to use the press. Maybe it would have worked on a larger, more
industrial-grade press.

I hope I don't have to replace the bearings, and the car seems to be
driving normally and smoothly. If something should happen to the
bearings on that side I'll definitely update this thread.

Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 09 Aug 2007, 08:54 pm
jim beam
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Axle replacement - 95 Accord

greg.berchelmann@gmail.com wrote:
> On Aug 9, 1:15 pm, "Michael Pardee" <michaeltn...@cybertrails.com>
> wrote:
>> "Greg" <centau...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>>
>> news:1186675079.936930.54290@e9g2000prf.googlegrou ps.com...
>>
>>>> 3lb hammer? unfortunately, you'll now need to replace the bearings
>>>> shortly.
>>>> for future reference, never beat the axle to get it out - use a proper
>>>> pulling tool that doesn't load the bearings. hammering brinnels the
>>>> bearings and reduces longevity to almost zero.
>>> Jim - thanks for your reply. Could you specifically suggest a tool
>>> that I should have used--preferably something I could buy online or at
>>> a local store? I looked around the web a bit and didn't see anything
>>> that I thought would work. I did see some tools for rear axles that
>>> use a slide-hammer. To be honest with you, the axle was stuck in there
>>> so badly that I really don't think a slide hammer would have gotten it
>>> out. Maybe when the axle is rusted in there that badly, you just have
>>> to hammer it out like I did and plan on replacing the bearings? I have
>>> another honda and if I have to do the same job on it, I'd like to make
>>> sure I do it the best way. Thanks again.

>> Here in Arizona we don't have that problem - no rust to speak of. A couple
>> taps with a rubber mallet on the back of the steering knuckle is enough. But
>> if we did, I'd probably go for a rag folded over to make a fairly thick pad
>> and then applying a heavy "mallet" (like the end of several feet of 2X4) to
>> the end. What you want is a "dead blow." Brinneling the bearings occurs if
>> the actual impact is so high it can dent the bearing races, while the real
>> work of separating the parts is done by transferring impulse. Similarly, you
>> can try holding the axle and whacking the knuckle (not yours, the car's!)
>> with a mallet on as many different locations as you can reach over and over.
>> As long as you don't lay metal to metal you shouldn't brinnel the bearings.
>> Patience might just pay off.
>>
>> The proper tool is undoubtedly a press, but that requires complete removal
>> of the steering knuckle. There may be nothing else to hold the bearings in
>> while pressing on the axle, so it is possible the bearings could come out
>> still jammed onto the axle splines. Or the disc may be in the way... dunno
>> about the '95 Accord in that way.
>>
>> In any case, for you the die has been cast. It would be great if you can
>> provide some follow-up regarding symptoms (noise, pulling toward the side
>> you were working on) and whether you had to replace the bearings as a
>> result.
>>
>> Mike
>>
>> "Good judgement comes from experience; experience often comes from bad
>> judgement."

>
> Thanks for your reply, Mike. Your explanation of how the bearings are
> impacted (!) makes a lot of sense to me. I think that concept applies
> to lots of other situations as well, so I'll keep it in mind for
> future reference.
>
> The friend who was helping me actually has a press in his basement,
> which is why we took out the whole knuckle and axle assembly. The
> problem that we had was that the attached axle did not fit through the
> hole on his press. There was no way to secure the assembly in such a
> way to use the press. Maybe it would have worked on a larger, more
> industrial-grade press.
>
> I hope I don't have to replace the bearings, and the car seems to be
> driving normally and smoothly. If something should happen to the
> bearings on that side I'll definitely update this thread.
>


you can't just use a press - not pressing against the knuckle anyway.
the "press" needs to be one that loads the axle from against the hub
inner so the bearings aren't involved like this:

http://www.thetoolwarehouse.net/shop/OTC-7208A.html

for bearing replacement, if you didn't have access to a press, this
would be the way to go:

http://www.thetoolwarehouse.net/shop/OTC-6537.html

you can sell it on craigslist again afterwards and get most of your
money back too!

Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 09 Aug 2007, 08:57 pm
jim beam
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Axle replacement - 95 Accord

Michael Pardee wrote:
> "Greg" <centaur99@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1186675079.936930.54290@e9g2000prf.googlegrou ps.com...
>>> 3lb hammer? unfortunately, you'll now need to replace the bearings
>>> shortly.
>>>
>>> for future reference, never beat the axle to get it out - use a proper
>>> pulling tool that doesn't load the bearings. hammering brinnels the
>>> bearings and reduces longevity to almost zero.

>> Jim - thanks for your reply. Could you specifically suggest a tool
>> that I should have used--preferably something I could buy online or at
>> a local store? I looked around the web a bit and didn't see anything
>> that I thought would work. I did see some tools for rear axles that
>> use a slide-hammer. To be honest with you, the axle was stuck in there
>> so badly that I really don't think a slide hammer would have gotten it
>> out. Maybe when the axle is rusted in there that badly, you just have
>> to hammer it out like I did and plan on replacing the bearings? I have
>> another honda and if I have to do the same job on it, I'd like to make
>> sure I do it the best way. Thanks again.
>>
>>

> Here in Arizona we don't have that problem - no rust to speak of. A couple
> taps with a rubber mallet on the back of the steering knuckle is enough. But
> if we did, I'd probably go for a rag folded over to make a fairly thick pad
> and then applying a heavy "mallet" (like the end of several feet of 2X4) to
> the end. What you want is a "dead blow." Brinneling the bearings occurs if
> the actual impact is so high it can dent the bearing races, while the real
> work of separating the parts is done by transferring impulse.


but if the axle is seized into the hub, that can't happen.

> Similarly, you
> can try holding the axle and whacking the knuckle (not yours, the car's!)
> with a mallet on as many different locations as you can reach over and over.
> As long as you don't lay metal to metal you shouldn't brinnel the bearings.
> Patience might just pay off.


dude, for $32, it's just not worth it. the tool takes care of
everything and no risk to the bearings whatsoever.

>
> The proper tool is undoubtedly a press, but that requires complete removal
> of the steering knuckle.


nope - see response to greg.

> There may be nothing else to hold the bearings in
> while pressing on the axle, so it is possible the bearings could come out
> still jammed onto the axle splines. Or the disc may be in the way... dunno
> about the '95 Accord in that way.
>
> In any case, for you the die has been cast. It would be great if you can
> provide some follow-up regarding symptoms (noise, pulling toward the side
> you were working on) and whether you had to replace the bearings as a
> result.
>
> Mike
>
> "Good judgement comes from experience; experience often comes from bad
> judgement."
>
>
>

Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 10 Aug 2007, 12:03 am
Michael Pardee
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Axle replacement - 95 Accord

"jim beam" <spamvortex@bad.example.net> wrote in message
news:0MydnV56yeTGWCbbnZ2dnUVZ_tKinZ2d@speakeasy.ne t...
>
> you can't just use a press - not pressing against the knuckle anyway. the
> "press" needs to be one that loads the axle from against the hub inner so
> the bearings aren't involved like this:
>
> http://www.thetoolwarehouse.net/shop/OTC-7208A.html
>
> for bearing replacement, if you didn't have access to a press, this would
> be the way to go:
>
> http://www.thetoolwarehouse.net/shop/OTC-6537.html
>
> you can sell it on craigslist again afterwards and get most of your money
> back too!
>
>

Cool links! Thanks, Jim. Although for the bearing I will just take it to a
local machine shop that does bearing replacements. Waiting a couple days is
easier on me than paying $300 for something I need so rarely.

Mike



Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 10 Aug 2007, 08:44 am
Greg
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Axle replacement - 95 Accord

On Aug 10, 12:03 am, "Michael Pardee" <michaeltn...@cybertrails.com>
wrote:
> "jim beam" <spamvor...@bad.example.net> wrote in message
>
> news:0MydnV56yeTGWCbbnZ2dnUVZ_tKinZ2d@speakeasy.ne t...
>
>
>
>
>
> > you can't just use a press - not pressing against the knuckle anyway. the
> > "press" needs to be one that loads the axle from against the hub inner so
> > the bearings aren't involved like this:

>
> >http://www.thetoolwarehouse.net/shop/OTC-7208A.html

>
> > for bearing replacement, if you didn't have access to a press, this would
> > be the way to go:

>
> >http://www.thetoolwarehouse.net/shop/OTC-6537.html

>
> > you can sell it on craigslist again afterwards and get most of your money
> > back too!

>
> Cool links! Thanks, Jim. Although for the bearing I will just take it to a
> local machine shop that does bearing replacements. Waiting a couple days is
> easier on me than paying $300 for something I need so rarely.
>
> Mike- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


Yep, thanks for the links Jim. Hopefully I won't have to replace that
front left bearing, but I will definitely consider having that first
puller tool around next time I have to remove some axles, especially
if I'm doing it myself. Thanks guys--as always, you all are a great
resource.

Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
90 Legend axle replacement, need advice Burleigh Acura 2 25 Jun 2006 09:07 am
'87 Acura Legend, front axle replacement Kaytibabe Acura 1 23 Jan 2006 05:56 pm
'90 Civic Axle Replacement Problem WaterWatcher Honda 3 1 19 Feb 2005 06:23 pm


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:53 am.


Attribution:
Honda News | Autoblog
Powered by Yahoo Answers




Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2 © 2011, Crawlability, Inc.
HondaCarForum.com is not affiliated with Honda Motor Company in any way. Honda Motor Company does not sponsor, support, or endorse HondaCarForum.com in any way. Copyright/trademark/sales mark infringements are not intended or implied.