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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 20 May 2006, 10:05 pm
Elle
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Installing Control Arm Bushings: Tips?

Anyone have any special tips for this?

I am struggling mightily with this for my front lower
driver's side control arm on my 91 Civic LX, 176k miles.

I heated the whole arm in the oven for about half an hour at
150 degrees F. I applied soap and then PB Blaster. I did not
clean the control arm bushing holes hardly at all, though. I
have to get some emery cloth.

Out of stupidity, while trying to install the new bushings,
I already somewhat mushroomed the bolt holes but I think I
recovered from that. I got the large one in but then, while
recovering from the mushrooming, it slipped out again.

I got the arm off easily this morning (all except the radius
rod bolts had been previously freed). I had problems all day
getting the outer sleeve of the bushings free. I cut out the
inner sleeve and rubber pretty easily, per my earlier thread
on this. But the outer sleeves seemed much tighter compared
to my practice control arm of a few weeks ago. Exhausting...

I see cautions in various auto newsgroup archives about
banging too much on the control arms. I am prepared to buy
one second hand from a junkyard, if need be. Also, it has
been so laborious today that I may very well take the
passenger side's control arm to my local Napa, which does
have bushing press service.

At this point I am thinking that, certainly for older cars,
replacing the bushings one's self is a huge roll of the dice
without industrial equipment. My experiment is largely a
failure.


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 21 May 2006, 09:19 am
Michael Pardee
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Installing Control Arm Bushings: Tips?

"Elle" <honda.lioness@nospam.earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:4OQbg.118$Yu1.51@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink .net...
> Anyone have any special tips for this?
>
> I am struggling mightily with this for my front lower driver's side
> control arm on my 91 Civic LX, 176k miles.
>
> I heated the whole arm in the oven for about half an hour at 150 degrees
> F. I applied soap and then PB Blaster. I did not clean the control arm
> bushing holes hardly at all, though. I have to get some emery cloth.
>
> Out of stupidity, while trying to install the new bushings, I already
> somewhat mushroomed the bolt holes but I think I recovered from that. I
> got the large one in but then, while recovering from the mushrooming, it
> slipped out again.
>
> I got the arm off easily this morning (all except the radius rod bolts had
> been previously freed). I had problems all day getting the outer sleeve of
> the bushings free. I cut out the inner sleeve and rubber pretty easily,
> per my earlier thread on this. But the outer sleeves seemed much tighter
> compared to my practice control arm of a few weeks ago. Exhausting...
>
> I see cautions in various auto newsgroup archives about banging too much
> on the control arms. I am prepared to buy one second hand from a junkyard,
> if need be. Also, it has been so laborious today that I may very well take
> the passenger side's control arm to my local Napa, which does have bushing
> press service.
>
> At this point I am thinking that, certainly for older cars, replacing the
> bushings one's self is a huge roll of the dice without industrial
> equipment. My experiment is largely a failure.
>

Not a failure; an experience!

I'm going to throw out this suggestion for comment, because it could produce
results ranging from resounding success to being stuck. How about
temperature-fitting the bushings; either freezing the bushings or heating
the control arm? The upside is that the parts should fit together with no
more than a solid blow or two from a mallet, while the downside is that if
they go partway you are probably no better off than you are now - maybe
worse - and don't get a second chance. I've never done it myself but I
assume the temperature difference fades quickly once the pieces are in
contact.

Does anybody know why bushings are fit so tightly? Bearings typically aren't
that tight.

Mike


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  #3 (permalink)  
Old 21 May 2006, 11:14 am
Grumpy AuContraire
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Installing Control Arm Bushings: Tips?



Michael Pardee wrote:
>
> "Elle" <honda.lioness@nospam.earthlink.net> wrote in message
> news:4OQbg.118$Yu1.51@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink .net...
> > Anyone have any special tips for this?
> >
> > I am struggling mightily with this for my front lower driver's side
> > control arm on my 91 Civic LX, 176k miles.
> >
> > I heated the whole arm in the oven for about half an hour at 150 degrees
> > F. I applied soap and then PB Blaster. I did not clean the control arm
> > bushing holes hardly at all, though. I have to get some emery cloth.
> >
> > Out of stupidity, while trying to install the new bushings, I already
> > somewhat mushroomed the bolt holes but I think I recovered from that. I
> > got the large one in but then, while recovering from the mushrooming, it
> > slipped out again.
> >
> > I got the arm off easily this morning (all except the radius rod bolts had
> > been previously freed). I had problems all day getting the outer sleeve of
> > the bushings free. I cut out the inner sleeve and rubber pretty easily,
> > per my earlier thread on this. But the outer sleeves seemed much tighter
> > compared to my practice control arm of a few weeks ago. Exhausting...
> >
> > I see cautions in various auto newsgroup archives about banging too much
> > on the control arms. I am prepared to buy one second hand from a junkyard,
> > if need be. Also, it has been so laborious today that I may very well take
> > the passenger side's control arm to my local Napa, which does have bushing
> > press service.
> >
> > At this point I am thinking that, certainly for older cars, replacing the
> > bushings one's self is a huge roll of the dice without industrial
> > equipment. My experiment is largely a failure.
> >

> Not a failure; an experience!
>
> I'm going to throw out this suggestion for comment, because it could produce
> results ranging from resounding success to being stuck. How about
> temperature-fitting the bushings; either freezing the bushings or heating
> the control arm? The upside is that the parts should fit together with no
> more than a solid blow or two from a mallet, while the downside is that if
> they go partway you are probably no better off than you are now - maybe
> worse - and don't get a second chance. I've never done it myself but I
> assume the temperature difference fades quickly once the pieces are in
> contact.
>


She mentioned that the control arm was heated to 150. I would suggest
200 as a more realistic temp which is still below that which would
degrade the assembly. Freezing the bushings will also help.

My experience in this is mostly with brand X cars but I have had little
problems with installing bushings using the temperature techniques. It
does help when a second person is available to hold the control arm on
top of a vise so that the OP can concentrate on "beating" the bushing
into location.



> Does anybody know why bushings are fit so tightly? Bearings typically aren't
> that tight.
>



Bushings are an "interference" fit which is a characteristic of many
static components. IOW, cheap stability. A bearing is a lubricated
pivot while the bushing is a static pivot using rubber instead of grease.


> Mike

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  #4 (permalink)  
Old 21 May 2006, 12:19 pm
Elle
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Got 'Em [was Re: Installing Control Arm Bushings: Tips?]

"Grumpy AuContraire" <Grumpster@GrumpyvilleNOT.com> wrote
> Michael Pardee wrote:
>> "Elle" <honda.lioness@nospam.earthlink.net> wrote
>> > Anyone have any special tips for this?
>> >
>> > I am struggling mightily with this for my front lower
>> > driver's side
>> > control arm on my 91 Civic LX, 176k miles.
>> >
>> > I heated the whole arm in the oven for about half an
>> > hour at 150 degrees
>> > F. I applied soap and then PB Blaster. I did not clean
>> > the control arm
>> > bushing holes hardly at all, though. I have to get some
>> > emery cloth.
>> >
>> > Out of stupidity, while trying to install the new
>> > bushings, I already
>> > somewhat mushroomed the bolt holes but I think I
>> > recovered from that. I
>> > got the large one in but then, while recovering from
>> > the mushrooming, it
>> > slipped out again.
>> >
>> > I got the arm off easily this morning (all except the
>> > radius rod bolts had
>> > been previously freed). I had problems all day getting
>> > the outer sleeve of
>> > the bushings free. I cut out the inner sleeve and
>> > rubber pretty easily,
>> > per my earlier thread on this. But the outer sleeves
>> > seemed much tighter
>> > compared to my practice control arm of a few weeks ago.
>> > Exhausting...
>> >
>> > I see cautions in various auto newsgroup archives about
>> > banging too much
>> > on the control arms. I am prepared to buy one second
>> > hand from a junkyard,
>> > if need be. Also, it has been so laborious today that I
>> > may very well take
>> > the passenger side's control arm to my local Napa,
>> > which does have bushing
>> > press service.
>> >
>> > At this point I am thinking that, certainly for older
>> > cars, replacing the
>> > bushings one's self is a huge roll of the dice without
>> > industrial
>> > equipment. My experiment is largely a failure.
>> >

>> Not a failure; an experience!


You're right. Much has been learned. I'm game now to go for
the passender side in a week or so, because I learned so
much doing the driver's side.

>> I'm going to throw out this suggestion for comment,
>> because it could produce
>> results ranging from resounding success to being stuck.
>> How about
>> temperature-fitting the bushings; either freezing the
>> bushings or heating
>> the control arm? The upside is that the parts should fit
>> together with no
>> more than a solid blow or two from a mallet, while the
>> downside is that if
>> they go partway you are probably no better off than you
>> are now - maybe
>> worse - and don't get a second chance. I've never done it
>> myself but I
>> assume the temperature difference fades quickly once the
>> pieces are in
>> contact.
>>

>
> She mentioned that the control arm was heated to 150. I
> would suggest
> 200 as a more realistic temp which is still below that
> which would
> degrade the assembly. Freezing the bushings will also
> help.
>
> My experience in this is mostly with brand X cars but I
> have had little
> problems with installing bushings using the temperature
> techniques. It
> does help when a second person is available to hold the
> control arm on
> top of a vise so that the OP can concentrate on "beating"
> the bushing
> into location.
>
>
>
>> Does anybody know why bushings are fit so tightly?
>> Bearings typically aren't
>> that tight.
>>

>
>
> Bushings are an "interference" fit which is a
> characteristic of many
> static components. IOW, cheap stability. A bearing is a
> lubricated
> pivot while the bushing is a static pivot using rubber
> instead of grease.


Good explanation

JT and Michael, I got them installed this morning. I think
the problem was my lack of experience and being too tired
yesterday evening. I agree heating the arm (though perhaps
to 200 F) and refrigerating the bushings for an hour or so
will help (with Honda bushings, at least), based on what I
saw yesterday and a few days ago when my bushings first
arrived. I didn't do either this morning and so probably put
forth more effort than necessary.

This morning the important things I did seemed to be
-- Sandpapering (100-C aluminum oxide grade) the insides of
the control arm holes.
-- Hammering just a little, and only on the outer sleeve
with a socket that fits it, to get things started. Line it
up carefully.
-- Using the socket-bolt-nut washer-(any ol' donut shaped
parts lying around that would help, and many did!)-approach
described at
http://www.maxcooper.com/rx7/how-to/...lls/index.html .
It didn't take all that much force. I used mostly a two-foot
pipe extension on my wrenches and wasn't applying my whole
weight or anything. It's important to have sockets that fit
the outer sleeve well, etc.
-- Do not push on the inner sleeve. Push strictly on the
outer sleeve (I wasn't doing this last night when I was
whacking away).
-- PB Blastering consistently through the process, both
sides of the bushing.

The bushings went in pretty smoothly, though it took awhile
as I hunted for parts and re-arranged sockets, washers,
donut-y parts.

Just knowing it can be done helps a lot.

Michael, about going halfway: If the bushing is aligned with
the control arm pretty well, that's when, after the last day
of experience, I now feel I can pretty easily push it in
with the socket-bolt-nut-washer-PBBlaster Max Cooper
approach.

If I heat the arms and freeze the bushings, admittedly I may
not have to whack at all.

I had originally ordered a "front control arm set" of Mugen
Bushings from KingMotorSports.com. They arrived in the mail
on time, but only two(!) bushings came in the package. The
control arms hold a total of four bushings (two small, two
large). I called King's non-toll free number, and the clerk
explained that I needed to order the large, "shock absorber"
bushings separately. That's not entirely clear from King's
web site. The cost per inboard Mugen bushing was a whopping
$25. Roiled, I sent them back and took the sizable
restocking fee and shipping/handling hit.

I called my favorite import auto repair shop to see what
they had to offer. They had for me OEM Honda parts at a
price that beats any OEM price on the net. Interestingly,
the guy at the shop explained to me that they buy the
bushings from the companies that make them. He showed me the
part nos. on the packaging and the bushings themselves, and
they do indeed match the OEM ones at Slhonda.com . When I
picked them up, I asked him what companies made them, and he
read them from the order form. Both of course are in Japan.

Having had no previous experience on this on which to rely,
I had a lot of doubts that I was doing things correctly and
so sought more input. Many thanks, JT and Michael.


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  #5 (permalink)  
Old 21 May 2006, 12:26 pm
Elle
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Installing Control Arm Bushings: Tips?

In another thread recently, JT (= Grumpy) said to heat the
entire arm. From further reading, I think local heating
with, say, a torch, runs a risk of deforming the arm. But I
dunno. I just figured if I wiped the control arm free of
dirt and oil, then the temperature would be low enough that
I wasn't risking a fire or filling the house up with the
odor of roasted control arm.

Should you need me to speak with your wife about cooking
auto parts in her oven, email me in private. ;-)

"Earle Horton" <earle-NOSPAM-horton@msn.com> wrote
> One of the perks of being female, I suppose, is that you
> can get away with
> putting auto parts in an oven. I hammered on a few
> control arms in my
> younger days, but I no longer do this. A large bench
> vise, a piece of
> threaded rod and some sockets, or a machine shop work much
> better. If you
> learn from this, it was not a "failure".



All true. I'm getting old. Ten years hence, I'm using Napa's
shop press service.


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  #6 (permalink)  
Old 21 May 2006, 12:26 pm
Earle Horton
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Installing Control Arm Bushings: Tips?

One of the perks of being female, I suppose, is that you can get away with
putting auto parts in an oven. I hammered on a few control arms in my
younger days, but I no longer do this. A large bench vise, a piece of
threaded rod and some sockets, or a machine shop work much better. If you
learn from this, it was not a "failure".

Earle

"Elle" <honda.lioness@nospam.earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:4OQbg.118$Yu1.51@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink .net...
> Anyone have any special tips for this?
>
> I am struggling mightily with this for my front lower
> driver's side control arm on my 91 Civic LX, 176k miles.
>
> I heated the whole arm in the oven for about half an hour at
> 150 degrees F. I applied soap and then PB Blaster. I did not
> clean the control arm bushing holes hardly at all, though. I
> have to get some emery cloth.
>
> Out of stupidity, while trying to install the new bushings,
> I already somewhat mushroomed the bolt holes but I think I
> recovered from that. I got the large one in but then, while
> recovering from the mushrooming, it slipped out again.
>
> I got the arm off easily this morning (all except the radius
> rod bolts had been previously freed). I had problems all day
> getting the outer sleeve of the bushings free. I cut out the
> inner sleeve and rubber pretty easily, per my earlier thread
> on this. But the outer sleeves seemed much tighter compared
> to my practice control arm of a few weeks ago. Exhausting...
>
> I see cautions in various auto newsgroup archives about
> banging too much on the control arms. I am prepared to buy
> one second hand from a junkyard, if need be. Also, it has
> been so laborious today that I may very well take the
> passenger side's control arm to my local Napa, which does
> have bushing press service.
>
> At this point I am thinking that, certainly for older cars,
> replacing the bushings one's self is a huge roll of the dice
> without industrial equipment. My experiment is largely a
> failure.
>
>




*** Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com ***
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  #7 (permalink)  
Old 21 May 2006, 12:37 pm
Earle Horton
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Installing Control Arm Bushings: Tips?

No, thanks. I learned after the brake drums in the dish washer.

Earle

"Elle" <honda.lioness@nospam.earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:Mo1cg.486$Yu1.26@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink .net...
> In another thread recently, JT (= Grumpy) said to heat the
> entire arm. From further reading, I think local heating
> with, say, a torch, runs a risk of deforming the arm. But I
> dunno. I just figured if I wiped the control arm free of
> dirt and oil, then the temperature would be low enough that
> I wasn't risking a fire or filling the house up with the
> odor of roasted control arm.
>
> Should you need me to speak with your wife about cooking
> auto parts in her oven, email me in private. ;-)
>
> "Earle Horton" <earle-NOSPAM-horton@msn.com> wrote
> > One of the perks of being female, I suppose, is that you
> > can get away with
> > putting auto parts in an oven. I hammered on a few
> > control arms in my
> > younger days, but I no longer do this. A large bench
> > vise, a piece of
> > threaded rod and some sockets, or a machine shop work much
> > better. If you
> > learn from this, it was not a "failure".

>
>
> All true. I'm getting old. Ten years hence, I'm using Napa's
> shop press service.
>
>




*** Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com ***
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 21 May 2006, 02:15 pm
Grumpy AuContraire
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Got 'Em [was Re: Installing Control Arm Bushings: Tips?]



Elle wrote:
>
> "Grumpy AuContraire" <Grumpster@GrumpyvilleNOT.com> wrote
> > Michael Pardee wrote:
> >> "Elle" <honda.lioness@nospam.earthlink.net> wrote
> >> > Anyone have any special tips for this?
> >> >
> >> > I am struggling mightily with this for my front lower
> >> > driver's side
> >> > control arm on my 91 Civic LX, 176k miles.
> >> >
> >> > I heated the whole arm in the oven for about half an
> >> > hour at 150 degrees
> >> > F. I applied soap and then PB Blaster. I did not clean
> >> > the control arm
> >> > bushing holes hardly at all, though. I have to get some
> >> > emery cloth.
> >> >
> >> > Out of stupidity, while trying to install the new
> >> > bushings, I already
> >> > somewhat mushroomed the bolt holes but I think I
> >> > recovered from that. I
> >> > got the large one in but then, while recovering from
> >> > the mushrooming, it
> >> > slipped out again.
> >> >
> >> > I got the arm off easily this morning (all except the
> >> > radius rod bolts had
> >> > been previously freed). I had problems all day getting
> >> > the outer sleeve of
> >> > the bushings free. I cut out the inner sleeve and
> >> > rubber pretty easily,
> >> > per my earlier thread on this. But the outer sleeves
> >> > seemed much tighter
> >> > compared to my practice control arm of a few weeks ago.
> >> > Exhausting...
> >> >
> >> > I see cautions in various auto newsgroup archives about
> >> > banging too much
> >> > on the control arms. I am prepared to buy one second
> >> > hand from a junkyard,
> >> > if need be. Also, it has been so laborious today that I
> >> > may very well take
> >> > the passenger side's control arm to my local Napa,
> >> > which does have bushing
> >> > press service.
> >> >
> >> > At this point I am thinking that, certainly for older
> >> > cars, replacing the
> >> > bushings one's self is a huge roll of the dice without
> >> > industrial
> >> > equipment. My experiment is largely a failure.
> >> >
> >> Not a failure; an experience!

>
> You're right. Much has been learned. I'm game now to go for
> the passender side in a week or so, because I learned so
> much doing the driver's side.
>
> >> I'm going to throw out this suggestion for comment,
> >> because it could produce
> >> results ranging from resounding success to being stuck.
> >> How about
> >> temperature-fitting the bushings; either freezing the
> >> bushings or heating
> >> the control arm? The upside is that the parts should fit
> >> together with no
> >> more than a solid blow or two from a mallet, while the
> >> downside is that if
> >> they go partway you are probably no better off than you
> >> are now - maybe
> >> worse - and don't get a second chance. I've never done it
> >> myself but I
> >> assume the temperature difference fades quickly once the
> >> pieces are in
> >> contact.
> >>

> >
> > She mentioned that the control arm was heated to 150. I
> > would suggest
> > 200 as a more realistic temp which is still below that
> > which would
> > degrade the assembly. Freezing the bushings will also
> > help.
> >
> > My experience in this is mostly with brand X cars but I
> > have had little
> > problems with installing bushings using the temperature
> > techniques. It
> > does help when a second person is available to hold the
> > control arm on
> > top of a vise so that the OP can concentrate on "beating"
> > the bushing
> > into location.
> >
> >
> >
> >> Does anybody know why bushings are fit so tightly?
> >> Bearings typically aren't
> >> that tight.
> >>

> >
> >
> > Bushings are an "interference" fit which is a
> > characteristic of many
> > static components. IOW, cheap stability. A bearing is a
> > lubricated
> > pivot while the bushing is a static pivot using rubber
> > instead of grease.

>
> Good explanation
>
> JT and Michael, I got them installed this morning. I think
> the problem was my lack of experience and being too tired
> yesterday evening. I agree heating the arm (though perhaps
> to 200 F) and refrigerating the bushings for an hour or so
> will help (with Honda bushings, at least), based on what I
> saw yesterday and a few days ago when my bushings first
> arrived. I didn't do either this morning and so probably put
> forth more effort than necessary.
>
> This morning the important things I did seemed to be
> -- Sandpapering (100-C aluminum oxide grade) the insides of
> the control arm holes.
> -- Hammering just a little, and only on the outer sleeve
> with a socket that fits it, to get things started. Line it
> up carefully.
> -- Using the socket-bolt-nut washer-(any ol' donut shaped
> parts lying around that would help, and many did!)-approach
> described at
> http://www.maxcooper.com/rx7/how-to/...lls/index.html .
> It didn't take all that much force. I used mostly a two-foot
> pipe extension on my wrenches and wasn't applying my whole
> weight or anything. It's important to have sockets that fit
> the outer sleeve well, etc.
> -- Do not push on the inner sleeve. Push strictly on the
> outer sleeve (I wasn't doing this last night when I was
> whacking away).
> -- PB Blastering consistently through the process, both
> sides of the bushing.
>



I always install bushings dry as to preserve the interference fit. I
just use a BFH on the (collar/socket) that is the driving interface to
the bushing. Also keep in mind that the bushings should be left in the
freezer overnight.

Regarding heating components for "fitting" purposes, good temperature
control can be achieved by using Tempil Sticks at temperature ratings of
200 & 225 F. This insures heating sufficiently but not exceeding to a
range that could lead to compromises structurally.


> The bushings went in pretty smoothly, though it took awhile
> as I hunted for parts and re-arranged sockets, washers,
> donut-y parts.
>
> Just knowing it can be done helps a lot.
>
> Michael, about going halfway: If the bushing is aligned with
> the control arm pretty well, that's when, after the last day
> of experience, I now feel I can pretty easily push it in
> with the socket-bolt-nut-washer-PBBlaster Max Cooper
> approach.
>
> If I heat the arms and freeze the bushings, admittedly I may
> not have to whack at all.
>
> I had originally ordered a "front control arm set" of Mugen
> Bushings from KingMotorSports.com. They arrived in the mail
> on time, but only two(!) bushings came in the package. The
> control arms hold a total of four bushings (two small, two
> large). I called King's non-toll free number, and the clerk
> explained that I needed to order the large, "shock absorber"
> bushings separately. That's not entirely clear from King's
> web site. The cost per inboard Mugen bushing was a whopping
> $25. Roiled, I sent them back and took the sizable
> restocking fee and shipping/handling hit.
>
> I called my favorite import auto repair shop to see what
> they had to offer. They had for me OEM Honda parts at a
> price that beats any OEM price on the net. Interestingly,
> the guy at the shop explained to me that they buy the
> bushings from the companies that make them. He showed me the
> part nos. on the packaging and the bushings themselves, and
> they do indeed match the OEM ones at Slhonda.com . When I
> picked them up, I asked him what companies made them, and he
> read them from the order form. Both of course are in Japan.
>
> Having had no previous experience on this on which to rely,
> I had a lot of doubts that I was doing things correctly and
> so sought more input. Many thanks, JT and Michael.



Gotta give ya credit for doing this work on a rust belt car. I'm
spoiled rotten with Texas tin where fifty year old bolts/nuts still turn freely...

JT
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  #9 (permalink)  
Old 21 May 2006, 02:17 pm
Grumpy AuContraire
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Installing Control Arm Bushings: Tips?

Well, you could have put them in the clothes washer on low agitate...

<G>

JT




Earle Horton wrote:
>
> No, thanks. I learned after the brake drums in the dish washer.
>
> Earle
>
> "Elle" <honda.lioness@nospam.earthlink.net> wrote in message
> news:Mo1cg.486$Yu1.26@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink .net...
> > In another thread recently, JT (= Grumpy) said to heat the
> > entire arm. From further reading, I think local heating
> > with, say, a torch, runs a risk of deforming the arm. But I
> > dunno. I just figured if I wiped the control arm free of
> > dirt and oil, then the temperature would be low enough that
> > I wasn't risking a fire or filling the house up with the
> > odor of roasted control arm.
> >
> > Should you need me to speak with your wife about cooking
> > auto parts in her oven, email me in private. ;-)
> >
> > "Earle Horton" <earle-NOSPAM-horton@msn.com> wrote
> > > One of the perks of being female, I suppose, is that you
> > > can get away with
> > > putting auto parts in an oven. I hammered on a few
> > > control arms in my
> > > younger days, but I no longer do this. A large bench
> > > vise, a piece of
> > > threaded rod and some sockets, or a machine shop work much
> > > better. If you
> > > learn from this, it was not a "failure".

> >
> >
> > All true. I'm getting old. Ten years hence, I'm using Napa's
> > shop press service.
> >
> >

>
> *** Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com ***

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  #10 (permalink)  
Old 21 May 2006, 03:53 pm
N.E.Ohio Bob
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Default Re: Got 'Em [was Re: Installing Control Arm Bushings: Tips?]

Grumpy AuContraire wrote:


>
> Gotta give ya credit for doing this work on a rust belt car. I'm
> spoiled rotten with Texas tin where fifty year old bolts/nuts still turn freely...
>
> JT


I'm looking for a rust free '92 Accord 2 door that I can put my
drivetrain and interior into. This *#!!ing rust is braking my heart.
bob
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