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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 17 Jun 2004, 07:25 pm
RLL
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Posts: n/a
Default Honda Acknowledges TL Quality Issues

Honda Acknowledges TL Quality Issues

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----

Don't know if you saw this (or if it a repost), but in the auto round table
in USA Today a couple weeks ago check out what the Honda guy said (bolded):

Carmakers eye economy with unease USA TODAY
An economic stumble - resulting in a fall in consumer confidence - is their
big worry this year, executives of the U.S. arms of five import automakers
say.
Despite better products, a new car "is an eminently postponable purchase if
you don't feel confident in the economy," said Nissan North America chief
Jed Connelly, who participated in an import automaker roundtable with USA
TODAY last week.

Others on the panel: Richard Colliver, head of American Honda Motor (HMC);
Donald Esmond, head of the Toyota (TM) brand in the USA; Robert Cosmai,
Hyundai Motor America's chief; and Victor Doolan, head of Volvo Cars of
North America.

Auto sales this year through April were up about 3% compared with a year
ago. Automakers sold 16.6 million in 2003. The panelists' predictions for
2004 ranged from about the same as last year to 16.9 million.

The Iraq war and the ever-present threat of terrorism are a drag on the
economy, Cosmai said, but "the overall driving force is: 'Am I going to be
working at the end of the month or at the end of this week?' "

Colliver noted that there are 2.3 million fewer jobs than in 2001, a fact
that keeps younger people out of the new-car market. "The lack of jobs has
driven the average age of our products up," he said.

Esmond said the economy is a concern short term. But he's optimistic about
the longer outlook. "We've got a lot of faith in the economy and the
direction. We know the U.S. market is going to grow, and we're making a lot
investment to grow with it."

The panel was questioned by USA TODAY automotive reporters James R. Healey,
Earle Eldridge, David Kiley and Jayne O'Donnell and automotive editor Judith
Barra Austin.

Question: Toyota's North American manufacturing chief, Art Niimi, says
suppliers here deliver 500 defective parts per million vs. 15 in Japan.
Assuming that's typical industrywide, what hope do buyers have of getting
top-quality vehicles from your North American factories?

Colliver: The Honda division actually improved (in quality scores) this
year, and where we slipped was on the Acura. The introduction of the
(U.S.-made) TL, we had a few quality issues that actually brought the Acura
down. But I think the relationship that you have with your suppliers is
critical, and they're long-term relationships. Like Don said, we don't go in
and threaten to take business away from these suppliers. We go in and work
with them to improve their efficiencies and qualities to help keep their
costs down.

Esmond: It may be 500 here, 15 in Japan, but the overalll quality of the
product is more than acceptable. I think we've been working with our
suppliers a long time in Japan and certainly (have) a much shorter hisotry
here in the states.

Besides the quality, there's a lot of cost pressure. I think what they
appreciate, at least working with Toyota, and I'm sure some of the others,
is we don't go in and say, "Reduce the costs by 6%; if you don't, somebody
else is going to get the business." We go in and say we want to come in and
help you where you can save costs so we can reduce our overall price. So
it's a different approach, and from my perspective, U.S. suppliers are more
than willing to do that, roll up their sleeves, and we'll go in with them
and help.

Connelly: Don hit the nail on the head. It's the length of the relationship
with the supplier base, and clearly, the relationship is much longer in
Japan. I think when you establish a new relationship in any industry, I
think there's a process that you go through until they understand exactly
what you want. But I don't think there's any question (that) the quality
from both places can be comparable. I think the longer you work with a
supplier and, like Don said, the more deeply you work with the supplier, I
think the better the relationship and the better results are going to be.
We're a lot newer building cars in the United States than we are in Japan.

Cosmai: This is going to be one of our larger challenges. In fact, about a
month ago, I was down in Montgomery, (Ala., where Hyundai is building a
factory) and some of the biggest things the people on the plant side have
been talking about is the interview of all the individual suppliers. Each
one comes on board one at a time. One of the biggest concerns from our
company's perspective is supplier relationships, and basically, we can do a
lot of things on the plant side, but if we don't have a relationship with
our suppliers as far as the quality end with them, that will be a real
challenge.

Talk is cheap. You have to deliver on it, and do it consistently over the
long run.



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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 21 Jun 2004, 06:33 pm
Kryptoknight
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Honda Acknowledges TL Quality Issues

namely the headliner issue???

what other issues does he speak of ???


"RLL" <rlombardo@cox.net> wrote in message
news:%DqAc.5214$tC5.1956@fed1read02...
> Honda Acknowledges TL Quality Issues
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------

--
> ----
>
> Don't know if you saw this (or if it a repost), but in the auto round

table
> in USA Today a couple weeks ago check out what the Honda guy said

(bolded):
>
> Carmakers eye economy with unease USA TODAY
> An economic stumble - resulting in a fall in consumer confidence - is

their
> big worry this year, executives of the U.S. arms of five import automakers
> say.
> Despite better products, a new car "is an eminently postponable purchase

if
> you don't feel confident in the economy," said Nissan North America chief
> Jed Connelly, who participated in an import automaker roundtable with USA
> TODAY last week.
>
> Others on the panel: Richard Colliver, head of American Honda Motor (HMC);
> Donald Esmond, head of the Toyota (TM) brand in the USA; Robert Cosmai,
> Hyundai Motor America's chief; and Victor Doolan, head of Volvo Cars of
> North America.
>
> Auto sales this year through April were up about 3% compared with a year
> ago. Automakers sold 16.6 million in 2003. The panelists' predictions for
> 2004 ranged from about the same as last year to 16.9 million.
>
> The Iraq war and the ever-present threat of terrorism are a drag on the
> economy, Cosmai said, but "the overall driving force is: 'Am I going to be
> working at the end of the month or at the end of this week?' "
>
> Colliver noted that there are 2.3 million fewer jobs than in 2001, a fact
> that keeps younger people out of the new-car market. "The lack of jobs has
> driven the average age of our products up," he said.
>
> Esmond said the economy is a concern short term. But he's optimistic about
> the longer outlook. "We've got a lot of faith in the economy and the
> direction. We know the U.S. market is going to grow, and we're making a

lot
> investment to grow with it."
>
> The panel was questioned by USA TODAY automotive reporters James R.

Healey,
> Earle Eldridge, David Kiley and Jayne O'Donnell and automotive editor

Judith
> Barra Austin.
>
> Question: Toyota's North American manufacturing chief, Art Niimi, says
> suppliers here deliver 500 defective parts per million vs. 15 in Japan.
> Assuming that's typical industrywide, what hope do buyers have of getting
> top-quality vehicles from your North American factories?
>
> Colliver: The Honda division actually improved (in quality scores) this
> year, and where we slipped was on the Acura. The introduction of the
> (U.S.-made) TL, we had a few quality issues that actually brought the

Acura
> down. But I think the relationship that you have with your suppliers is
> critical, and they're long-term relationships. Like Don said, we don't go

in
> and threaten to take business away from these suppliers. We go in and work
> with them to improve their efficiencies and qualities to help keep their
> costs down.
>
> Esmond: It may be 500 here, 15 in Japan, but the overalll quality of the
> product is more than acceptable. I think we've been working with our
> suppliers a long time in Japan and certainly (have) a much shorter hisotry
> here in the states.
>
> Besides the quality, there's a lot of cost pressure. I think what they
> appreciate, at least working with Toyota, and I'm sure some of the others,
> is we don't go in and say, "Reduce the costs by 6%; if you don't, somebody
> else is going to get the business." We go in and say we want to come in

and
> help you where you can save costs so we can reduce our overall price. So
> it's a different approach, and from my perspective, U.S. suppliers are

more
> than willing to do that, roll up their sleeves, and we'll go in with them
> and help.
>
> Connelly: Don hit the nail on the head. It's the length of the

relationship
> with the supplier base, and clearly, the relationship is much longer in
> Japan. I think when you establish a new relationship in any industry, I
> think there's a process that you go through until they understand exactly
> what you want. But I don't think there's any question (that) the quality
> from both places can be comparable. I think the longer you work with a
> supplier and, like Don said, the more deeply you work with the supplier, I
> think the better the relationship and the better results are going to be.
> We're a lot newer building cars in the United States than we are in Japan.
>
> Cosmai: This is going to be one of our larger challenges. In fact, about a
> month ago, I was down in Montgomery, (Ala., where Hyundai is building a
> factory) and some of the biggest things the people on the plant side have
> been talking about is the interview of all the individual suppliers. Each
> one comes on board one at a time. One of the biggest concerns from our
> company's perspective is supplier relationships, and basically, we can do

a
> lot of things on the plant side, but if we don't have a relationship with
> our suppliers as far as the quality end with them, that will be a real
> challenge.
>
> Talk is cheap. You have to deliver on it, and do it consistently over the
> long run.
>
>
>



Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 21 Jun 2004, 09:56 pm
Nightdude
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Honda Acknowledges TL Quality Issues

Tire issue might be one of them and another seat memory was a problem. Other
than that.. I dunno.

But this is a first year of the new TL...you got to give them a chance.


"Kryptoknight" <kryptoknight@att.net> wrote in message
news:%eKBc.111289$Gx4.2476@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> namely the headliner issue???
>
> what other issues does he speak of ???
>
>
> "RLL" <rlombardo@cox.net> wrote in message
> news:%DqAc.5214$tC5.1956@fed1read02...
>> Honda Acknowledges TL Quality Issues
>>
>> --------------------------------------------------------------------------

> --
>> ----
>>
>> Don't know if you saw this (or if it a repost), but in the auto round

> table
>> in USA Today a couple weeks ago check out what the Honda guy said

> (bolded):
>>
>> Carmakers eye economy with unease USA TODAY
>> An economic stumble - resulting in a fall in consumer confidence - is

> their
>> big worry this year, executives of the U.S. arms of five import
>> automakers
>> say.
>> Despite better products, a new car "is an eminently postponable purchase

> if
>> you don't feel confident in the economy," said Nissan North America chief
>> Jed Connelly, who participated in an import automaker roundtable with USA
>> TODAY last week.
>>
>> Others on the panel: Richard Colliver, head of American Honda Motor
>> (HMC);
>> Donald Esmond, head of the Toyota (TM) brand in the USA; Robert Cosmai,
>> Hyundai Motor America's chief; and Victor Doolan, head of Volvo Cars of
>> North America.
>>
>> Auto sales this year through April were up about 3% compared with a year
>> ago. Automakers sold 16.6 million in 2003. The panelists' predictions for
>> 2004 ranged from about the same as last year to 16.9 million.
>>
>> The Iraq war and the ever-present threat of terrorism are a drag on the
>> economy, Cosmai said, but "the overall driving force is: 'Am I going to
>> be
>> working at the end of the month or at the end of this week?' "
>>
>> Colliver noted that there are 2.3 million fewer jobs than in 2001, a fact
>> that keeps younger people out of the new-car market. "The lack of jobs
>> has
>> driven the average age of our products up," he said.
>>
>> Esmond said the economy is a concern short term. But he's optimistic
>> about
>> the longer outlook. "We've got a lot of faith in the economy and the
>> direction. We know the U.S. market is going to grow, and we're making a

> lot
>> investment to grow with it."
>>
>> The panel was questioned by USA TODAY automotive reporters James R.

> Healey,
>> Earle Eldridge, David Kiley and Jayne O'Donnell and automotive editor

> Judith
>> Barra Austin.
>>
>> Question: Toyota's North American manufacturing chief, Art Niimi, says
>> suppliers here deliver 500 defective parts per million vs. 15 in Japan.
>> Assuming that's typical industrywide, what hope do buyers have of getting
>> top-quality vehicles from your North American factories?
>>
>> Colliver: The Honda division actually improved (in quality scores) this
>> year, and where we slipped was on the Acura. The introduction of the
>> (U.S.-made) TL, we had a few quality issues that actually brought the

> Acura
>> down. But I think the relationship that you have with your suppliers is
>> critical, and they're long-term relationships. Like Don said, we don't go

> in
>> and threaten to take business away from these suppliers. We go in and
>> work
>> with them to improve their efficiencies and qualities to help keep their
>> costs down.
>>
>> Esmond: It may be 500 here, 15 in Japan, but the overalll quality of the
>> product is more than acceptable. I think we've been working with our
>> suppliers a long time in Japan and certainly (have) a much shorter
>> hisotry
>> here in the states.
>>
>> Besides the quality, there's a lot of cost pressure. I think what they
>> appreciate, at least working with Toyota, and I'm sure some of the
>> others,
>> is we don't go in and say, "Reduce the costs by 6%; if you don't,
>> somebody
>> else is going to get the business." We go in and say we want to come in

> and
>> help you where you can save costs so we can reduce our overall price. So
>> it's a different approach, and from my perspective, U.S. suppliers are

> more
>> than willing to do that, roll up their sleeves, and we'll go in with them
>> and help.
>>
>> Connelly: Don hit the nail on the head. It's the length of the

> relationship
>> with the supplier base, and clearly, the relationship is much longer in
>> Japan. I think when you establish a new relationship in any industry, I
>> think there's a process that you go through until they understand exactly
>> what you want. But I don't think there's any question (that) the quality
>> from both places can be comparable. I think the longer you work with a
>> supplier and, like Don said, the more deeply you work with the supplier,
>> I
>> think the better the relationship and the better results are going to be.
>> We're a lot newer building cars in the United States than we are in
>> Japan.
>>
>> Cosmai: This is going to be one of our larger challenges. In fact, about
>> a
>> month ago, I was down in Montgomery, (Ala., where Hyundai is building a
>> factory) and some of the biggest things the people on the plant side have
>> been talking about is the interview of all the individual suppliers. Each
>> one comes on board one at a time. One of the biggest concerns from our
>> company's perspective is supplier relationships, and basically, we can do

> a
>> lot of things on the plant side, but if we don't have a relationship with
>> our suppliers as far as the quality end with them, that will be a real
>> challenge.
>>
>> Talk is cheap. You have to deliver on it, and do it consistently over the
>> long run.
>>
>>
>>

>
>



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